Posts tagged "evolution"

birdandmoon:

Every branch of nature-watching has its own ridiculously tough IDs. Feel free to substitute your own!

Here’s a link to this comic on my site.

Cute. So cute. 

And for the really tough cases, I’ll get out the PCR kit and the molecular genetics software…get us some bootstrap values….

open-scrutiny:

Darwin’s Pigeons, in All Their Genetic Variety
From the New York Times with photos by Richard Bailey
“They might be called the “rats of the sky,” but Charles Darwin certainly saw something in pigeons. It turns out the father of evolution saw in the bird an amazing variety of variation in color, shape and form. Richard Bailey, a photographer based in London, honored the 150th anniversary since the publication of “On the Origin of Species” and the 200th anniversary in 2009 of Charles Darwin’s birth by photographing some of the pigeon breeds that played such an important part in Darwin’s work.”

Aaaahhhhh so much variation from your lowly common pigeon. As much as people complain about them all the time, I will still love them regardless. 
And I remember reading the article about the huge variation in them last week at work. I wish I remembered to save the link to that article, but the one they give you here the link is pretty good too. So enjoy folks.

open-scrutiny:

Darwin’s Pigeons, in All Their Genetic Variety

From the New York Times with photos by Richard Bailey

They might be called the “rats of the sky,” but Charles Darwin certainly saw something in pigeons. It turns out the father of evolution saw in the bird an amazing variety of variation in color, shape and form. Richard Bailey, a photographer based in London, honored the 150th anniversary since the publication of “On the Origin of Species” and the 200th anniversary in 2009 of Charles Darwin’s birth by photographing some of the pigeon breeds that played such an important part in Darwin’s work.”

Aaaahhhhh so much variation from your lowly common pigeon. As much as people complain about them all the time, I will still love them regardless. 

And I remember reading the article about the huge variation in them last week at work. I wish I remembered to save the link to that article, but the one they give you here the link is pretty good too. So enjoy folks.

sciencecenter:

motherjones:

So, there’s that.
(via)

The science is undeniable. 
Except for, well, all of it.

Well Jasmin. Glad you are taking our inconsistencies seriously. Because someone has to fight for our superiority over ducks. Damn those fine feathered cretins wanting better than us humans. GOOD FOR YOU. You deserve a pat on the back. 
Next thing you know, we’ll have the sea sponges walking all over us, and let’s not even talk about the legions upon legions of microorganisms around us. Ssssh they’ll hear us!

sciencecenter:

motherjones:

So, there’s that.

(via)

The science is undeniable. 

Except for, well, all of it.

Well Jasmin. Glad you are taking our inconsistencies seriously. Because someone has to fight for our superiority over ducks. Damn those fine feathered cretins wanting better than us humans. GOOD FOR YOU. You deserve a pat on the back. 

Next thing you know, we’ll have the sea sponges walking all over us, and let’s not even talk about the legions upon legions of microorganisms around us. Ssssh they’ll hear us!

You know what would be funny? Darwin ought to be a recluse professor in the Pokemon world that none of the other professors listen to, because he insists to the scientific community that they are using the term evolution wrong. And that “their” evolution should just be called PokeDevelopment or some shit like that. And he should live with a Piplup that he calls Pippy. Pippy likes to wear bowties and help with taxidermy. 
Well I think it’d be funny.
Feel free to hang me now.

You know what would be funny? Darwin ought to be a recluse professor in the Pokemon world that none of the other professors listen to, because he insists to the scientific community that they are using the term evolution wrong. And that “their” evolution should just be called PokeDevelopment or some shit like that. And he should live with a Piplup that he calls Pippy. Pippy likes to wear bowties and help with taxidermy. 

Well I think it’d be funny.

Feel free to hang me now.

(via pleasantevilness)

jtotheizzoe:

Your “Research Dollars At Work” Science Image of the Day!
Hairy Men Make Good Bedbug Catchers

” … researchers recruited 19 volunteers with various amounts of body hair and shaved one of each of their arms. They then asked the subjects to look away while they dropped bedbugs onto their arms.”

This is actually an important study when it comes to overcoming the bedbug infestation the U.S. is currently dealing with. This study also shows that how much hair you have on your body can determine how long you can “bear” a pest on your skin.
(via ScienceNOW)

Ha ha ha. Interesting. Perhaps every month should be no-shave November.

jtotheizzoe:

Your “Research Dollars At Work” Science Image of the Day!

Hairy Men Make Good Bedbug Catchers

” … researchers recruited 19 volunteers with various amounts of body hair and shaved one of each of their arms. They then asked the subjects to look away while they dropped bedbugs onto their arms.”

This is actually an important study when it comes to overcoming the bedbug infestation the U.S. is currently dealing with. This study also shows that how much hair you have on your body can determine how long you can “bear” a pest on your skin.

(via ScienceNOW)

Ha ha ha. Interesting. Perhaps every month should be no-shave November.

(via fuckyeahmedicalstuff)

sciencecenter:

Moth’s true colors shine after 47 million years

Pause for a moment. Go back to the title of the post. 47 million years ago. That blows my mind. It’s been 47 million years since this puny moth flew around the Earth, and today, scientists have figured out what it actually looked like. Unbelievable.

“Until now, we had no idea what colors ancient moths and butterflies had,” said Yale University paleogeologist Maria McNamara.

The fossils’ time-machined hues exist because moths and butterfly wings have what’s known as structural color. Rather than pigments, structural colors are created by light-warping nanoscale surface features; if fossilization occurs delicately enough, and the intervening eons are gentle, those structures can be reproduced and preserved indefinitely.

Structural colors are also what give butterfly wings, beetle shells, and peacock feathers that iridescent quality. Amazing how such structures can be create such a grand effect through physics on a such a tiny tiny tiny scale. Even more amazing is how things ranging within the nanoscale can be preserved. 

I'm nothing special. No really. I actually don't know why people listen to what I say. Though if you truly want to know more about me (Heaven forbid), you can ask me questions I suppose.

Also, if you can't tell, I happen to really like science, food, weird stuff, and learning. Have at it. And stay classy. p:

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